thekhooll:

Syria: Before Peter Aaron
"During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents. Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”" [text via]
Zoom Info
thekhooll:

Syria: Before Peter Aaron
"During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents. Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”" [text via]
Zoom Info
thekhooll:

Syria: Before Peter Aaron
"During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents. Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”" [text via]
Zoom Info
thekhooll:

Syria: Before Peter Aaron
"During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents. Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”" [text via]
Zoom Info
thekhooll:

Syria: Before Peter Aaron
"During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents. Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”" [text via]
Zoom Info
thekhooll:

Syria: Before Peter Aaron
"During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents. Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”" [text via]
Zoom Info
thekhooll:

Syria: Before Peter Aaron
"During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents. Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”" [text via]
Zoom Info
thekhooll:

Syria: Before Peter Aaron
"During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents. Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”" [text via]
Zoom Info
thekhooll:

Syria: Before Peter Aaron
"During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents. Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”" [text via]
Zoom Info
thekhooll:

Syria: Before Peter Aaron
"During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents. Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”" [text via]
Zoom Info

thekhooll:

Syria: Before Peter Aaron

"During a family vacation to Syria in 2009, architectural photographer Peter Aaron captured many of the country’s landmarks—historic mosques, Roman ruins, ancient citadels. Just two years later, the violent civil war erupted between government forces and insurgents. Over the course of the crisis, the incessant fighting has torn apart a nation and its heritage. By some estimates, more than 150,000 people have died; even the United Nations has quit keeping track. Historic architectural marvels—many which have stood for more than a thousand years—have been scarred by mortar or reduced to rubble by shelling and gunfire. Aaron’s lush photographs—on view at ARTspace gallery in Germantown, New York, until September 7th—are ghostly mementos of a time before the conflict. In Aleppo’s Great Mosque, its stately 11th-century minaret has been completely obliterated by tank fire. A medieval hilltop citadel in the same city served as a fortress for snipers and has suffered damage from a barrage of shells. The images still haunt Aaron. “We got to know some people during our three weeks there, and we wonder what’s happened to them,” Aaron says. “Are they all still alive?”" [text via]

sagansense:

child-of-thecosmos:


Radio and television broadcasting may be only a brief passing phase in our technological development. When we imagine alien civilizations broadcasting signals with radio telescopes, are we any different from earlier generations who imagined riding cannon shells to the moon? Civilizations even slightly more advanced than ours may have already moved on to some other mode of communication, one that we have yet to discover or even imagine. Their messages could be swirling all around us at this very moment, but we lack the means to perceive them just as all of our ancestors, up to a little more than a century ago, would have been oblivious to the most urgent radio signal from another world. 
But there’s another more troubling possibility: Civilizations, like other living things, may only live so long before perishing due to natural causes, or violence, or self-inflicted wounds. Whether or not we ever make contact with intelligent alien life may depend on a critical question: What is the life expectancy of a civilization?

- Episode 11: The Immortals, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

Recommended reading:

Everything you need to know about this book can be found in this wonderfully thorough review by Astrobiology Magazine from 2003.

I plan on doing a full writeup/review about this book; however, I can tell you it’s one of the best Carl’s ever written and is still heavily referenced by scientists across multiple fields regarding the search for extraterrestrial life, be it intelligent or otherwise. A review on the book and the study of astrobiology itself can be via a PDF by Charley Lineweaver of the Planetary Science Institute at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Research School of Earth Sciences.
The most fascinating aspect of this book is that it was originally written by I.S. Shklovskii in Russian, re-translated into English, whereby Carl adds his scientific “two-cents”, expanding on subjects and explaining further in a way only Carl, himself, can. For instance, the last paragraph in Chapter 31: Interstellar contact by automatic probe vehicles:

“At this point in the Russian edition of the present work, Shklovskii expresses his belief that civilizations are not inevitably doomed to self-destruction, despite his description of contemporary Western literature as filled with details of atomic holocaust. He expresses his belief that as long as capitalism exists on Earth, a violent end to intelligent life on the planet is probable. There is reason to assume, he asserts, that future peaceful societies will be constructed on the basis of Communism. I am able to imagine alternative scenarios for the future. No one today lives in a society which closely resembles Adam Smith capitalism or Karl Marx communism. The political dichotomies of the twentieth century may seem to our remote descendants no more exhaustive of the range of possibilities for the entire future of mankind than do, for us, the alternatives of the European religious wars of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. As Shklovskii says, the forces of peace in the world are great. Mankind is not likely to destroy itself. There is too much left to do.”

Also recommended:

SETI Scientist Jill Tarter provided a beautiful TED Talk about this subject, and in this interview with NOVA, she speaks on being the inspiration for Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan’s book/film ‘Contact’ whereby Jodie Foster portrays Dr. Tarter.

Seth Shostak, Senior Astronomer for SETI, presented an enriching TED Talk about why he’s convinced we’re closer than ever in detecting, contacting, or receiving signals from ETI; and recently, had a Q&A conversation with Science 2.0 appropriately titled “Why I Believe We’ll Find Aliens.”

…stay curious.
Zoom Info
sagansense:

child-of-thecosmos:


Radio and television broadcasting may be only a brief passing phase in our technological development. When we imagine alien civilizations broadcasting signals with radio telescopes, are we any different from earlier generations who imagined riding cannon shells to the moon? Civilizations even slightly more advanced than ours may have already moved on to some other mode of communication, one that we have yet to discover or even imagine. Their messages could be swirling all around us at this very moment, but we lack the means to perceive them just as all of our ancestors, up to a little more than a century ago, would have been oblivious to the most urgent radio signal from another world. 
But there’s another more troubling possibility: Civilizations, like other living things, may only live so long before perishing due to natural causes, or violence, or self-inflicted wounds. Whether or not we ever make contact with intelligent alien life may depend on a critical question: What is the life expectancy of a civilization?

- Episode 11: The Immortals, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

Recommended reading:

Everything you need to know about this book can be found in this wonderfully thorough review by Astrobiology Magazine from 2003.

I plan on doing a full writeup/review about this book; however, I can tell you it’s one of the best Carl’s ever written and is still heavily referenced by scientists across multiple fields regarding the search for extraterrestrial life, be it intelligent or otherwise. A review on the book and the study of astrobiology itself can be via a PDF by Charley Lineweaver of the Planetary Science Institute at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Research School of Earth Sciences.
The most fascinating aspect of this book is that it was originally written by I.S. Shklovskii in Russian, re-translated into English, whereby Carl adds his scientific “two-cents”, expanding on subjects and explaining further in a way only Carl, himself, can. For instance, the last paragraph in Chapter 31: Interstellar contact by automatic probe vehicles:

“At this point in the Russian edition of the present work, Shklovskii expresses his belief that civilizations are not inevitably doomed to self-destruction, despite his description of contemporary Western literature as filled with details of atomic holocaust. He expresses his belief that as long as capitalism exists on Earth, a violent end to intelligent life on the planet is probable. There is reason to assume, he asserts, that future peaceful societies will be constructed on the basis of Communism. I am able to imagine alternative scenarios for the future. No one today lives in a society which closely resembles Adam Smith capitalism or Karl Marx communism. The political dichotomies of the twentieth century may seem to our remote descendants no more exhaustive of the range of possibilities for the entire future of mankind than do, for us, the alternatives of the European religious wars of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. As Shklovskii says, the forces of peace in the world are great. Mankind is not likely to destroy itself. There is too much left to do.”

Also recommended:

SETI Scientist Jill Tarter provided a beautiful TED Talk about this subject, and in this interview with NOVA, she speaks on being the inspiration for Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan’s book/film ‘Contact’ whereby Jodie Foster portrays Dr. Tarter.

Seth Shostak, Senior Astronomer for SETI, presented an enriching TED Talk about why he’s convinced we’re closer than ever in detecting, contacting, or receiving signals from ETI; and recently, had a Q&A conversation with Science 2.0 appropriately titled “Why I Believe We’ll Find Aliens.”

…stay curious.
Zoom Info
sagansense:

child-of-thecosmos:


Radio and television broadcasting may be only a brief passing phase in our technological development. When we imagine alien civilizations broadcasting signals with radio telescopes, are we any different from earlier generations who imagined riding cannon shells to the moon? Civilizations even slightly more advanced than ours may have already moved on to some other mode of communication, one that we have yet to discover or even imagine. Their messages could be swirling all around us at this very moment, but we lack the means to perceive them just as all of our ancestors, up to a little more than a century ago, would have been oblivious to the most urgent radio signal from another world. 
But there’s another more troubling possibility: Civilizations, like other living things, may only live so long before perishing due to natural causes, or violence, or self-inflicted wounds. Whether or not we ever make contact with intelligent alien life may depend on a critical question: What is the life expectancy of a civilization?

- Episode 11: The Immortals, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

Recommended reading:

Everything you need to know about this book can be found in this wonderfully thorough review by Astrobiology Magazine from 2003.

I plan on doing a full writeup/review about this book; however, I can tell you it’s one of the best Carl’s ever written and is still heavily referenced by scientists across multiple fields regarding the search for extraterrestrial life, be it intelligent or otherwise. A review on the book and the study of astrobiology itself can be via a PDF by Charley Lineweaver of the Planetary Science Institute at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Research School of Earth Sciences.
The most fascinating aspect of this book is that it was originally written by I.S. Shklovskii in Russian, re-translated into English, whereby Carl adds his scientific “two-cents”, expanding on subjects and explaining further in a way only Carl, himself, can. For instance, the last paragraph in Chapter 31: Interstellar contact by automatic probe vehicles:

“At this point in the Russian edition of the present work, Shklovskii expresses his belief that civilizations are not inevitably doomed to self-destruction, despite his description of contemporary Western literature as filled with details of atomic holocaust. He expresses his belief that as long as capitalism exists on Earth, a violent end to intelligent life on the planet is probable. There is reason to assume, he asserts, that future peaceful societies will be constructed on the basis of Communism. I am able to imagine alternative scenarios for the future. No one today lives in a society which closely resembles Adam Smith capitalism or Karl Marx communism. The political dichotomies of the twentieth century may seem to our remote descendants no more exhaustive of the range of possibilities for the entire future of mankind than do, for us, the alternatives of the European religious wars of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. As Shklovskii says, the forces of peace in the world are great. Mankind is not likely to destroy itself. There is too much left to do.”

Also recommended:

SETI Scientist Jill Tarter provided a beautiful TED Talk about this subject, and in this interview with NOVA, she speaks on being the inspiration for Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan’s book/film ‘Contact’ whereby Jodie Foster portrays Dr. Tarter.

Seth Shostak, Senior Astronomer for SETI, presented an enriching TED Talk about why he’s convinced we’re closer than ever in detecting, contacting, or receiving signals from ETI; and recently, had a Q&A conversation with Science 2.0 appropriately titled “Why I Believe We’ll Find Aliens.”

…stay curious.
Zoom Info
sagansense:

child-of-thecosmos:


Radio and television broadcasting may be only a brief passing phase in our technological development. When we imagine alien civilizations broadcasting signals with radio telescopes, are we any different from earlier generations who imagined riding cannon shells to the moon? Civilizations even slightly more advanced than ours may have already moved on to some other mode of communication, one that we have yet to discover or even imagine. Their messages could be swirling all around us at this very moment, but we lack the means to perceive them just as all of our ancestors, up to a little more than a century ago, would have been oblivious to the most urgent radio signal from another world. 
But there’s another more troubling possibility: Civilizations, like other living things, may only live so long before perishing due to natural causes, or violence, or self-inflicted wounds. Whether or not we ever make contact with intelligent alien life may depend on a critical question: What is the life expectancy of a civilization?

- Episode 11: The Immortals, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

Recommended reading:

Everything you need to know about this book can be found in this wonderfully thorough review by Astrobiology Magazine from 2003.

I plan on doing a full writeup/review about this book; however, I can tell you it’s one of the best Carl’s ever written and is still heavily referenced by scientists across multiple fields regarding the search for extraterrestrial life, be it intelligent or otherwise. A review on the book and the study of astrobiology itself can be via a PDF by Charley Lineweaver of the Planetary Science Institute at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Research School of Earth Sciences.
The most fascinating aspect of this book is that it was originally written by I.S. Shklovskii in Russian, re-translated into English, whereby Carl adds his scientific “two-cents”, expanding on subjects and explaining further in a way only Carl, himself, can. For instance, the last paragraph in Chapter 31: Interstellar contact by automatic probe vehicles:

“At this point in the Russian edition of the present work, Shklovskii expresses his belief that civilizations are not inevitably doomed to self-destruction, despite his description of contemporary Western literature as filled with details of atomic holocaust. He expresses his belief that as long as capitalism exists on Earth, a violent end to intelligent life on the planet is probable. There is reason to assume, he asserts, that future peaceful societies will be constructed on the basis of Communism. I am able to imagine alternative scenarios for the future. No one today lives in a society which closely resembles Adam Smith capitalism or Karl Marx communism. The political dichotomies of the twentieth century may seem to our remote descendants no more exhaustive of the range of possibilities for the entire future of mankind than do, for us, the alternatives of the European religious wars of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. As Shklovskii says, the forces of peace in the world are great. Mankind is not likely to destroy itself. There is too much left to do.”

Also recommended:

SETI Scientist Jill Tarter provided a beautiful TED Talk about this subject, and in this interview with NOVA, she speaks on being the inspiration for Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan’s book/film ‘Contact’ whereby Jodie Foster portrays Dr. Tarter.

Seth Shostak, Senior Astronomer for SETI, presented an enriching TED Talk about why he’s convinced we’re closer than ever in detecting, contacting, or receiving signals from ETI; and recently, had a Q&A conversation with Science 2.0 appropriately titled “Why I Believe We’ll Find Aliens.”

…stay curious.
Zoom Info

sagansense:

child-of-thecosmos:

Radio and television broadcasting may be only a brief passing phase in our technological development. When we imagine alien civilizations broadcasting signals with radio telescopes, are we any different from earlier generations who imagined riding cannon shells to the moon? Civilizations even slightly more advanced than ours may have already moved on to some other mode of communication, one that we have yet to discover or even imagine. Their messages could be swirling all around us at this very moment, but we lack the means to perceive them just as all of our ancestors, up to a little more than a century ago, would have been oblivious to the most urgent radio signal from another world. 

But there’s another more troubling possibility: Civilizations, like other living things, may only live so long before perishing due to natural causes, or violence, or self-inflicted wounds. Whether or not we ever make contact with intelligent alien life may depend on a critical question: What is the life expectancy of a civilization?

- Episode 11: The Immortals, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

Recommended reading:

image

Everything you need to know about this book can be found in this wonderfully thorough review by Astrobiology Magazine from 2003.

image

I plan on doing a full writeup/review about this book; however, I can tell you it’s one of the best Carl’s ever written and is still heavily referenced by scientists across multiple fields regarding the search for extraterrestrial life, be it intelligent or otherwise. A review on the book and the study of astrobiology itself can be via a PDF by Charley Lineweaver of the Planetary Science Institute at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Research School of Earth Sciences.

The most fascinating aspect of this book is that it was originally written by I.S. Shklovskii in Russian, re-translated into English, whereby Carl adds his scientific “two-cents”, expanding on subjects and explaining further in a way only Carl, himself, can. For instance, the last paragraph in Chapter 31: Interstellar contact by automatic probe vehicles:

At this point in the Russian edition of the present work, Shklovskii expresses his belief that civilizations are not inevitably doomed to self-destruction, despite his description of contemporary Western literature as filled with details of atomic holocaust. He expresses his belief that as long as capitalism exists on Earth, a violent end to intelligent life on the planet is probable. There is reason to assume, he asserts, that future peaceful societies will be constructed on the basis of Communism. I am able to imagine alternative scenarios for the future. No one today lives in a society which closely resembles Adam Smith capitalism or Karl Marx communism. The political dichotomies of the twentieth century may seem to our remote descendants no more exhaustive of the range of possibilities for the entire future of mankind than do, for us, the alternatives of the European religious wars of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. As Shklovskii says, the forces of peace in the world are great. Mankind is not likely to destroy itself. There is too much left to do.

Also recommended:

image

SETI Scientist Jill Tarter provided a beautiful TED Talk about this subject, and in this interview with NOVA, she speaks on being the inspiration for Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan’s book/film ‘Contact’ whereby Jodie Foster portrays Dr. Tarter.

image

Seth Shostak, Senior Astronomer for SETI, presented an enriching TED Talk about why he’s convinced we’re closer than ever in detecting, contacting, or receiving signals from ETI; and recently, had a Q&A conversation with Science 2.0 appropriately titled “Why I Believe We’ll Find Aliens.”

image

…stay curious.